The Dolomites for Seniors

It  was hot  – too hot – in southern France, and much of the world this summer. Day after day.  Week after week.  I had to escape.  The mountains called.  I chose Italy’s Dolomites, about 650 kilometers (400 miles) from our abode in Roquebrune Cap Martin, France.  We made the drive in two days, less stress for seniors, with an overnight stop in Brescia. 

Brescia for an overnight stop and beer break. City cathedral in background,

As a passionate skier (sadly those days are over), I knew some of the Dolomite’s famous slopes, including the renowned Sella Ronda, a 500 -kilometer ski circuit.  It stretches through four valleys around the Sella mountain which are also connected by road passes.   And, I remembered a challenging ascent to the Adamello, a 11,000-foot peak, many, many years ago.  I was eager to return to these mighty mountains – even without the challenges and excitement of bygone days.

This would be a Dolomites for Seniors trip. I am not as fit as I was in younger days, and husband Bob is struggling with Alzheimer. No overnights in mountain huts for us. No all-day killer hikes. Not even strenuous 1/2 day treks. Been there. Done that. We would take leisurely walks and drive – not hike -through the heights. Thanks to tips from friend Noel and his Italian buddy Fabio, we stayed in a lovely, if not luxurious, apartment in the town of La Villa.  My  friend Karen was with us.

Unlike us, Karen is a very fit senior and dedicated walker.  She set off every morning for two-hour hikes.  Bob does not move too quickly in the morning.  While Karen hiked, I got Bob up, dressed and breakfasted.  When she came back,  we were ready for adventure at a slow, senior pace.

My trusty new Suzuki Swift, Poppy, was the perfect mountain car.  Agile, responsive and fun.  She took those curves like a champ, and they were endless. Not quite like my beloved Porsche, but that too was a different era.

We drove the Sella Ronda route, up and down, switchback after switchback. Fortunately, there are places to pull off for photos.  During our week in these rugged mountains, I went photo crazy.   I could not resist.  Every view was a postcard.

While Bob and I are not up to strenuous treks, we figured we could try a gentle mountain walk.  We followed the advice of a local and set off on a trail  to  the hut/rifugio, Munt Pasciantado. The jaunt was not exactly senior flat as we had been led to believe. There is no such thing in the Dolomites.  Yet, it was pleasant and the goulash lunch at the rifugio was delicious. Goulash, not pasta, in Italy?

We were in South Tyrol, known as Sud Tyrol in German and Alto Adige in Italian.  The region borders Austria to the north, and was part of Austria-Hungary until it was annexed by Italy after World War I. There are three official languages:  Italian, German and Ladin. The latter is an ancient Rhaeto-Romance dialect derived from popular Latin and spoken by just four percent of the population. Ladin is also spoken in the Engadine Valley in Switzerland.

Most everyone in Sud Tyrol is  bilingual, and most Ladins are tri-lingual. We were in the southern part where more Italian than German is spoken, yet there is much that is Germanic, such as the  architecture and food.  

We had another fun and tasty rifugio interlude at Rifugio Valparola at the top of a mountain pass where  more German specials were on the menu: Bratwurst, potato salad and apple strudel. The cozy ambience was 100 % gemütlich, almost like being back in Germany. Hikers, bicyclists and motorcyclists savoured their accomplishments and replenished themselves after strenuous activity. We had not earned those calories, but we still enjoyed. I even went for the Italian finale:  Grappa.  The rifugio has 10 different flavors of this fiery brew, all homemade.  I followed the owner’s suggestion and went for Cirolo Zirm, delicious, although I have no idea what the flavor was.

The rifugio was on our route to Cortina d’Ampezzo, a ski resort that is part  of Dolomiti Superski, the largest ski area in the world.  We were disappointed. in the town, but the drive was spectacular.

We could not hike to the peaks, but we could ride.  From Corvara, just a few kilometers from our apartment in La Villa, we rode a gondola then a chairlift to a windblown, barren area with super views of surrounding mountains and endless photo opps. Getting off a moving chairlift with no boards attached to your feet and no snow on the ground can be tricky — at least for some seniors. We conquered, but with senior angst.

The part of Sud Tryol around the Sella Massif is Ladinia, the heart of the Dolomites where 30,000 Ladins live. In addition to their language,  they have their own culture, traditions and culinary specials.  Since food is a travel highlight for me,  I was eager to try  Ladin cuisine.

Claudine Saltuari, a manager at our apartment complex (www.dolomit.it), suggested an agriturismo, Maso Runch. We have been to many agriturismi over the years, usually rustic farms which offer simple local food and lodging.  This one was especially popular, and only with Claudine’s assistance could we get a reservation.

It was like no other agriturismo – china, crystal and fine wines – and more popular with seniors than the younger set. The food was copious, course after course.  Following a hearty barley soup, we tasted three different kinds of tutres, pastry filled with spinach, sauerkraut or potatoes. Both are popular in the Ladin kitchen.


Next came a pasta course, ravioli filled with spinach.  And more — multiple platters with goulash, pork shank, polenta, sauerkraut, fried potatoes.   We were stuffed, but could not pass on the dessert: Apple fritters with ice cream.  After all that, a digestif Grappa was in order.    

For more about the Ladins, we visited the Museum Ladin Ciastel de Tor in the town of Badia – good senior activity. The informative and well-presented displays are housed in an ancient, restored castle.    For centuries Ladins lived somewhat isolated in this terrain of steep, rocky slopes.  They were poor, living off the harsh land.  Things began to change with more skiers and hikers discovering the attractions and beauty of the Dolomites.  Tourism brought opportunity for an easier life.  As they began to intermarry and intermingle, preserving the language became challenging. In Ladinia, children learn both German and Italian in school, and Ladin three times per week.

We found cool and delightful temperatures in the Dolomites – and much more.  No need to be a hardcore athlete to appreciate the Dolomites. Even old folks can enjoy this awesome region.

Scroll down for more photos.

When the sun is shining, sunset in the Dolomites is magnificent.
Same mountain as above. Dolomite clouds can also be spectacular.
I had a fun chat in German with this gentleman at a local products market in the nearby town of San Cassiano, a cute and classy village.
Church in San Cassiano
Apple Strudel. We could not get enough of this favorite which the French have not mastered. Several afternoons we did the German ritual, Kaffe und Kuchen (strudel). But, Italians not forgotten. Sometimes we opted for the Italian custom: Late afternoon apero with savoury snacks.

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